E.6c Food, Sleep, Sex

7. Outline two examples illustrating the adaptive value of rhythmical behavior patterns.

Example: moonrats, Echinosorex gymnura

  • nocturnal
    • foraging at night in lowland forests, by smell
    • for invertebrates, which are also active at night
    • when predators are less active
    • rest in holes during the day, where they are difficult to locate

Example: red deer, Cervus elaphus

  • reproduce in the autumn, following an annual cycle
    • both males and females are only sexually active in autumn months
    • males fight to establish dominance hierarchies
    • females form herds associating with a single dominant male, with whom they mate
    • gestation occurs over winter, offspring born in spring
    • system maximizes fitness for:
      • young: maximizing feeding time before 1st winter
      • females: mate only with highest quality male
      • males: large genetic payoff for dominant male, at cost of no genetic payoff for excluded males
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2 thoughts on “E.6c Food, Sleep, Sex

  1. Dave Ferguson says:

    IB 1-7

    Grade 4 A good general understanding of the required knowledge and skills, and the ability to apply them effectively in normal situations. There is occasional evidence of the skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.

  2. Dave Ferguson says:

    IB 1-7

    Grade 3 Limited achievement against most of the objectives, or clear difficulties in some areas. The student demonstrates a limited understanding of the required knowledge and skills and is only able to apply them fully in normal situations with support.

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